AFRICA MOUNTAIN CLIMBING ADVENTURE PACKAGES 2024 / 2025

Climb 2 of the tallest mountains in East Africa – Mount Kilimanjaro & Mount Kenya

Safari tourist posing by a view of Mount Kenya

They are the two tallest mountains in Africa – both higher than 5,200 metres (17,000 ft). A climb up either is like a journey through the earth’s climate systems – starting in equatorial rain forests, then to alpine meadows, progressing to high desert, and ultimately to a barren moonscape of rock, snow, and ice.

And each peak offers adventurers the opportunity to dig deep within and discover the personal strength to climb through challenging weather and altitude. No great technical skills are required, although some physical training will help climbers muster through the increasingly thin air and sometimes windy conditions.

But for those who are willing to commit, we offer the chance of a lifetime to discover incredible vistas all about and a world of satisfaction… within.

Climb Mount Kilimanjaro

Africa's tallest peak (Roof of Africa), and world's tallest free standing mountain.

Africa mountain climbing adventures climb mount Kenya and mount Kilimanajaro

An icon of Africa, its tallest peak and the highest free-standing mountain in the world, Kilimanjaro, or “Kili” attracts thousands of intrepid climbers every year. Most are confident they will conquer its  5,895 m. (19,340 ft.) peak and many do, though just about everyone will feel some effects of the altitude.

There are seven routes up the mountain and depending on your choice, your climb will range from four to six nights. The most popular routes are the Machame and the Marangu, with the latter being one of the easier routes, meaning it will take six to seven days.

As a general rule, you should know that the more time you spend on the mountain, the better your chances are for a successful climb. In fact, each additional day on Kilimanjaro dramatically increases your odds of reaching the summit.

Sign to congratulate climbers at the Uhuru Peak of Mount Kilimanjaro

Climb Mount Kenya

highest mountain in Kenya and the second-highest in Africa, after Kilimanjaro.

Group of safari tourists at the base of Mount Kenya getting ready to climb to the peak
Climbing Mount Kenya

Much like the climb on Kilimanjaro, an ascent up Mt. Kenya will take you through multiple climate zones, starting in a bamboo forest, up to a cooler wooded region, then higher to alpine reaches, and finally topping out on glaciers, rock, and snow.

But you may be treated to animal sightings along your route such as elephants, buffalos, monkeys, antelope, and even giant forest hogs further up. As you near the higher reaches, you’ll take in views of mountain lakes on your way to the summit. Mt. Kenya has three peaks of which only Point Lenana at 4985 m (16,354 ft) is reachable for novice climbers.

To reach Lenana, most climbers ascend using one of these three routes: Sirimon, Chogoria, and Naro Moru. Climb one of these routes and you can take a different route back down. Along your way, choose either outdoor camps or huts on all three routes.

A good estimate for your time on the mountain is about five days for the ascent and then the return back down. Remember, at these elevations, slower is better to help prevent the effects of altitude sickness.

Best Time For Your Climbing Adventure

You’ll want to tackle Kilimanjaro and Mt. Kenya during the warmest and driest months of January/February, or from June through August. Try to avoid the rainy seasons from March to early June and November/December.

But know that on these great peaks, the weather is unpredictable. A cold front can unexpectedly move in so make sure you have the right gear.

Mount Kilimanjaro climbing adventure tours - Africa Kenya Safaris
Camping during a mountain climbing experience at Mount Kenya provided by Africa Kenya Safaris

Prepping For Your Climb

It’s important to try to get into the best possible shape so you’ll have the greatest odds of success for your climb. Being mentally and physically prepared will also make your adventure significantly more enjoyable.

Aerobic exercise is the key. Regular hikes will help your heart, lungs, and stamina. Try to increase the length of your hikes as your climb approaches. You can also add cycling, swimming, or running to your training to help your cardiovascular performance.      

Bring Everything You Need… But No More!

Climbing these high-elevation peaks means bringing specialized gear to fend off the unpredictable weather. But that doesn’t mean unlimited piles of stuff. That’s just more weight for you or your porter to haul up the hill.

In fact, you’ll probably be limited to a maximum of 40 pounds, so just bring the important gear which we list below. You’ll need to be prepared for a large range of temperatures: 250 c (770 f) at the tropical base of your climb, all the way down to – 100 c (140 f) at the summit.

Say “no” to cotton and “yes” to wool. Cotton is not a great insulator, especially when wet. Wool and synthetics check all the boxes for comfort, warmth, and wicking away moisture.

Mountain climbing bag and equipment

The Clothing You’ll Need

5 mountain climbers approaching a steep incline in East Africa

A four-base layer system is best for managing heat, cold, and moisture.

Base Layer – wicks moisture and perspiration from your skin – use synthetics such as capiline.

Soft Shell – this is a comfortable and insulating wind and water-resistant layer. Look for Polartec, Gore Windstopper, or fleece.

Hard Shell – a more heavy-duty layer that is breathable yet windproof and waterproof. Ex. Goretex

Insulating Layer – Either synthetic or down-filled final layer to fit over the others.

Don’t forget a warm woolen or fleece hat, plus a shade hat with a wide brim for sun protection. A bandana is always helpful as are strong sunglasses to protect from high-altitude sun rays.

Two sets of gloves are recommended – a thin pair and thicker ones with fleece and a waterproof outer shell.

The same system applies to socks – a thin pair of synthetics, followed by a heavier pair of wool or polypropylene. And of course, hiking boots – medium weight will do for your uphill trek.

Your sleeping bag is essential for your nighttime comfort. Bring a four-season bag that is rated down to – 290 c (-200 f).

Safari tourists climbing Mount Kenya

Other Essentials

One quart water bottle and water treatment tablets.

Headlamp – for night hiking and just all-around hands-free use at camp

Toiletries, sunscreen, first aid kit, towel, light shoes for use around camp, and optional snacks.

And to carry it all – a day pack with padded straps.

And A Final Word

Since a climb up one of these high-altitude mountains is not something one regularly does, climbers should see a physician for a checkup before departing for their Mt. Kenya or Kilimanjaro adventure.

Make sure you’re in good enough shape to tackle these big hills and we’ll make sure you have an enjoyable climb!

Peak of Mount Kenya
Group of mountain climbers in East Africa
Africa mountain climbing adventures climb mount Kenya and mount Kilimanajaro
Reaching the peak of a mountain in East Africa

Kilimanjaro is climbable all year round.

The best months to climb, however, are July to October and December to February, as these are the warmest and driest months respectively.

July, August and September tend to be the busiest months on the mountain.

Another factor to take into consideration is the full moon. Summiting Kilimanjaro on a cloudless evening with the moon as your guide instead of headlamp is without a doubt an unforgettable experience. Also imagine seeing the glaciers glitter in the moonlight – absolutely stunning! 

Definitely Yes! After you Kilimanjaro climb, continue on one of our local safaris to Tanzania’s Serengeti, Ngorongoro, Lake Manyara, Tarangire or other colorful Tanzania wildlife parks.

You can also embark on a combined Kenya & Tanzania safari and explore Kenya’s incredible wildlife parks like Masai Mara, Amboseli, Lake Nakuru, Tsavo East, Tsavo West, Ol Pejeta, Meru National Park, Samburu National Reserve e.t.c.

What’s more?

After safari, you can also treat yourself to a magical laid-back beach vacation to Zanzibar beach, Diani beach, Mombasa, Malindi, Watamu and Lamu Island.

 A straightforward answer to that question is NO! It is illegal to explore Kilimanjaro independently without a guide. Unlike many other treks, it is not possible to just turn up at the foot of Kilimanjaro with a backpack and camping gear and head up the mountain.

 Furthermore, Mount Kilimanjaro is not an easy climb, so climbing it with experienced guides is a must not only from a legal point of view but also for your safety.

Yes, at our our Mountain climbing base hotel in Moshi Tanzania, we have a wide array of mountain climbing equipment for hire at competitive prices.

We will send you a comprehensive equipment checklist, including items available for hire, upon inquiry. Prices are for the duration of the climb, not per day, and costs can be paid in USD$ cash at your briefing. All equipment is of good quality, however, we advise bringing your own walking boots, socks, and base layer clothing, as these will inevitably be a better fit than items you hire. 

Mount Kilimanjaro requires no technical climbing skills and is considered a “safe” mountain. However, climbing Kilimanjaro exposes your body and mind to a number of challenges. On your way to the top, expect to hike about 4-7h per day and around 10-13h on summit day.

But that’s just the physical challenge. In addition, your body is also exposed to altitude and needs time to acclimatise. Some routes offer a better acclimatisation profile than others. Here is an article with an overview of all Kilimanjaro routes. Machame or Lemosho route are popular choices due to their acclimatisation profile and higher success rate. Both routes go early (day 3) up to 4600m and then down again to 3900m. What’s called “Hike high sleep low” is an important concept to acclimatise efficiently.

 

The third challenge for your body (beside the hiking and the high altitude) are temperature fluctuations and camping below 0 degrees celsius. Once the sun sets, temperatures go down quickly below 0.

That being said, any person with good physical and mental fitness and the right attitude is able to summit Kilimanjaro.
 
But be aware of the above factors (physical challenge, altitude, temperature) and know how to mitigate them. I.e. get yourself solid gear, take the right safety measures and prepare physically for the climb. You should be all set then for an adventure of a lifetime.

MARANGU ROUTE: The Marangu or main route is by far the most popular way to the summit. The ascent is more gradual and no professional equipment is required. The accommodation on the way up and down is provided in mountain huts with all the basic necessities. There are 60 bunk beds each (for 60 people each) at Mandara Hut (2700m) and Kibo Hut (4700m), and 120 bunk beds (for 120 people) at Horombo Hut (3720m) which is also used for descent. Climbers are supplied with mattresses and pillows, but sleeping bags should be brought along. There are communal dining halls, washrooms and toilets.

It usually takes 5 days/4nights for the round trip. The trek can also be taken in 6 days/5 nights to add acclimatization with an extra day at Horombo Hut. The supplementary cost for an extra day is indicated separately as an option.

MACHAME ROUTE: This is probably the most scenic route up Kilimanjaro. The accommodation on the way up and down is strictly camping (mobile tents) only.  This trek is strenuous and may be better suited to more adventurous hikers. The Machame route is normally completed in a minimum of 6 days/5nights on the mountain.

RONGAI ROUTE: There is only one route over on the north eastern side of the mountain, Rongai, which is usually a five night climb. This lesser known track may not be quite as spectacular as the western routes, but it does usually have far lower traffic than the other five night routes. This route retains a sense of unspoilt wilderness and offers a different perspective on Kilimanjaro by approaching it from the north.It is generally considered to be the easiest of the quality routes on the mountain. Rongai is the best route for people who are looking for a decent quality experience and are perhaps not absolutely confident about their fitness.

 UMBWE ROUTE: The Umbwe route, which is based in the south, is a 6-day / 5-night tour and is said to be the most scenic and difficult one offered on Kilimanjaro. The first two days are extremely steep, muddy and generally strenuous making it only suitable for well-trained mountaineers. An acclimatization day is rarely offered on the standard programme, but can be added whereby giving the climber an extra day in the Karanga Valley. The descent trail is the same as the Mweka Route.

LEMOSHO(SHIRA) GLADES ROUTE: The Lemosho Glades route is perhaps the least used initial ascent route on Kilimanjaro, partly because of its remote location and likewise the difficult roads leading to the trailhead. The road to the trailhead is only accessible by 4-wheel drive vehicles and can be impassable during wet periods. The trailhead is at relatively high elevation, and thus we start slow and easy on this route. Buffalo and elephant sightings are possible on the first day trekking through the forest, and the trail is often overgrown from lack of use.

The route is the longest distance to trek up Kilimanjaro, so fitness certainly plays a role in the enjoyment and success of this trek. The Lemosho (Shira) route takes 7 days / 6 nights on the mountain. Overall, the distance covered and the intensity of the final few days make this trek a good choice only for the experienced hiker.  The many changes of scenery and spectacular hike across the Shira Plateau make this trek truly special. There are no huts on this route, the accommodation is in mountain tents.

Each route has its own benefits and drawbacks. The Marangu Route is most popular with beginner trekkers, as it is one of the easiest – but you’ll also find it busier than some of the other routes. The Umbwe Route is one of the most difficult, and shouldn’t be undertaken unless you have mountaineering experience.

Why Marangu Route is the easiest and best route for beginners:

The Marangu route is one of the most popular routes to the summit of Kilimanjaro. This could partly be as a result of the fact that it is the least expensive route, or perhaps the fact that it is possible to do the Marangu route in 5 days, thereby getting to the summit one day earlier compared to the Machame route, that takes 6 or 7 days and is nicknamed Whisky Route – for being a tough climb, but with impressive views and a variety of habitats.

Due to a shorter acclimatisation period, it might not be the best option though.

What to consider when choosing your Kilimanjaro climbing route:

When you come to choose your Kilimanjaro route, there are several factors you need to take into consideration. The first of these is acclimatisation – some routes climb more steeply, making altitude sickness more of a risk. The next is the difficulty of the route, in particular the summit night – its success rate gives you some indication of this. The accommodation options and how busy the route is are something to take into consideration. Finally, there’s how scenic the route is – a decent view really enriches the hiking experience.

Children under the age of 10 are not allowed to climb Mount Kilimanjaro. The highest a child can go on Kilimanjaro is 3,100 meters (10,170 feet). Most of the routes on Kilimanjaro reach that elevation by the second day of the climb.

This rule is enforced by the Tanzania National Parks Authority (TANAPA). They will not allow a child under 10 to climb unless under special circumstances. If you desire your child to climb, you must have approval from TANAPA before arriving in Tanzania. Few children have received this special permission.

Who is the Youngest Person to Summit Mount Kilimanjaro?

Several children under the age of ten have requested special permission to climb Kilimanjaro, and were granted right(s) to do so.

Coltan Tanner – from Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA – holds the place as the youngest person to summit Mount Kilimanjaro.

Who is the Oldest Person to Summit Mount Kilimanjaro?

Anne Lorimor – from Arizona, USA – is the oldest person to have climbed to Mount Kilimanjaro’s summit. She was 89 years and 37 days old when she stood on top of the continent of Africa.

This was actually Lorimor’s second time climbing Mount Kilimanjaro – she first climbed when she was 85 years old – setting the record for oldest person to summit at that time. Another climber, Angela Vorobeva, from Russia climbed and had beat Lorimor’s record.

Mount Kilimanjaro routes and their variations take between five to nine days to complete. Although Mount Kilimanjaro is known as a “walk-up” mountain, you should not underestimate it and its risks. The overall statistics show that less than half of all climbers reach the summit.

PEAKS ON MOUNT KILIMANAJARO:

Kibo:

Kibo is the tallest of the volcanoes. It rises above two other peaks: Shira to the west and Mawenzi to the southeast. Kibo is dormant, while Shira and Mawenzi are extinct. Scientists expect no volcanic activity anywhere on Kilimanjaro in the foreseeable future.

Mawenzi:

Mawenzi is the second-highest peak on Kilimanjaro, standing at 16,890 feet. Trekkers get a great view of Mawenzi toward the end of the journey because the most popular summit routes snake up the eastern side of the mountain.

Shira:

Shira is the shortest “peak” at roughly 13,000 feet in elevation. It was once higher but collapsed to its current height thousands of years ago, creating the bowl-shaped Shira Plateau. Each of our preferred routes, except the Umbwe Route, trek the Shira Plateau within the first 3 days of the climb.

CRATERS & CLIFFS ON MOUNT KILIMAJARO:

Lava Tower:

At roughly 15,200 feet in elevation on the western side of mountain, the 300-foot Lava Tower looms. The rock formation was created by a volcanic vent long ago. Trekkers with technical mountaineering skills and equipment used to climb Lava Tower, but park officials have since banned the practice. Now, it’s simply a favorite sight for trekkers on the mountain.

The Barranco Wall:

Trekkers still climb this 800-foot cliff that rises over the Barranco Valley to the southwest of Uhuru Peak. The Barranco Wall is simultaneously one of the most difficult and one of our guests’ favorite portions of the climb. Machame, Umbwe and Western Approach trekkers use their hands and legs to “scramble” up the rocky slopes – no technical equipment or expertise required.

Rebmann Glacier:

You may see a few different glaciers while you trek around the rim of Kibo. The first will likely be the Rebmann Glacier, which is part of the Southern Icefield. Keep an eye out when you pass Stella Point on your way to Uhuru Peak. If you’re lucky, you’ll see this wall of ice standing in the distance down the mountain opposite the crater. You likely won’t get that close to it, though.

Furtwängler Glacier:

If you have your heart set on a close encounter with one of the few glaciers in Africa, Furtwängler is your best bet. This wall of ice is a short distance from Crater Camp inside the caldera on top of Kibo.

POINTS ON MOUNT KILIMANJARO:

Gilman’s Point:

This where the Rongai, Marangu and Grand Traverse trails reach the eastern side of Kibo’s rim at roughly 18,650 feet.

Stella Point:

This where the Umbwe, Machame and Western Approach routes reach the rim of Kibo at about 18,885 feet. Stella Point is closer to the summit than Gilman’s Point. Trekkers reaching Kibo’s rim from Gilman’s Point will trek to Stella Point on the way to Uhuru Peak.

Uhuru Peak:

This is the end of your journey – the summit of Kilimanjaro and the “Roof of Africa” where the iconic summit sign is. It is the highest point on Kibo’s rim.

Don’t underestimate how tough Kilimanjaro is. Too many people do, and don’t make it to the top!

Depending on your current fitness, we suggest that you start your physical training at least two or three months prior to the climb. 

Remember, the fitter you are, the more enjoyable the whole experience will be for you.

On the day before the trek (arrival day) and the day after the trek (departure day), we stay in a comfortable hotel in Moshi. It has lovely views as well as lovely rooms and facilities to match.

During the climb, you sleep in three-person, four-season dome-style mountain tents, two people per tent. If you’d like a tent of your own, you’ll need to pay a single-person supplement.

Our tents are modern and have an outer flysheet and large vestibules where you can store your equipment during the night.

Tipping is highly appreciated at the end of safari/ hiking:

Tips will vary depending on the length and complexity of the trip, the number of staff on the trip and the number of clients on the trip. Generally, groups like to meet together before the end of the trek to discuss how much they would like to tip each staff member based on their individual trek experience.You should prepare an envelope after your trek for your tip money at the Springlands Hotel.

You can use US dollars, Euros, TZ Shillings or a combination of these. The envelope will be submitted to mountain coordinator.

The following are daily rates for each climber recommended to tip per staff member:

  • Per Chief Guide: $15- 20 Per day
  • Per Assistant guide:  $10- 15 Per day
  • Per Cook$10 Per day
  • Per Porter: $8-10 Per day

NB: THESE ARE JUST GUIDELINES AND TIPS CAN BE GIVEN TO SAFARI STAFFS/MOUNTAIN CREW ACCORDING TO SERVICES PROVIDED.

For Marangu Route, you will have:

  • 1 guide and 1 cook for each 8 climbers,
  • 1 extra assistant guide per each
  • 3 climbers, 2 porters per climber

For all Kilimanjaro routes except Marangu you will have:

  • 1 climber: 1 guide, 3 porters, 1 cook
  • 2 climbers: 1 guide, 6 porters, 1 extra assistance guide, 1 cook
  • 3 climbers: 1 guide, 9 porters, 1 extra assistance guide, 1 cook
  • 4 climbers: 2 guides, 9 porters, 1 extra assistance guide, 1 cook, 1 waiter

On the first day of your climb, you are likely to lose signal before reaching the gate and will not regain it until day two. From then onwards, for most routes, you will find the signal at some point, and sometimes even in camp. On the Rongai route and Northern, Circuit reception can be more limited and tends to be via Kenyan networks, as the routes pass close to the border.

At the base of the mountain, average temperatures are 70 to 90°F (21 to 32°C) throughout the year. On the summit, temperatures range from -10 to 23°F (-23 to -5°C) with windchill. Weather is changeable, and you should be prepared for these extremes. Your guide will help you decide on appropriate clothing in a detailed daily briefing.

 

Please ensure you have sufficient Medical Cover for the duration of your trip and in particular to cover you while doing the Kilimanjaro Climb. Africa Kenya Safaris recommends WORLD NOMADS . Check them out: https://www.worldnomads.com/travel-insurance

Trekking poles have a number of benefits, especially if you have trouble with your knees or hips. There is scientific evidence they reduce the forces on your body, especially when walking down steep hills. Poles improve power and endurance when walking uphill, as energy output is distributed over more muscle groups. They help with balance on uneven trails and improve posture, which in turn can help with breathing.

AFRICA MOUNTAIN CLIMBING ADVTURE TOUR PACKAGES 2023 / 2024
Climb 2 of tallest mountains in Africa – Mount Kilimanjaro & Mount Kenya

Enjoy a classic climb on Mount Kilimanjaro via the “Coca-Cola” route.

Climb kili on the “Whiskey Route” which Promises Incredible Views

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Mount Kilimanjaro climbing routes

Africa mountain climbing adventures climb mount Kenya and mount Kilimanajaro

MARANGU ROUTE: The Marangu or main route is by far the most popular way to the summit. The ascent is more gradual and no professional equipment is required. The accommodation on the way up and down is provided in mountain huts with all the basic necessities. There are 60 bunk beds each (for 60 people each) at Mandara Hut (2700m) and Kibo Hut (4700m), and 120 bunk beds (for 120 people) at Horombo Hut (3720m) which is also used for descent. Climbers are supplied with mattresses and pillows, but sleeping bags should be brought along. There are communal dining halls, washrooms and toilets.

It usually takes 5 days/4nights for the round trip. The trek can also be taken in 6 days/5 nights to add acclimatization with an extra day at Horombo Hut. The supplementary cost for an extra day is indicated separately as an option.

MACHAME ROUTE: This is probably the most scenic route up Kilimanjaro. The accommodation on the way up and down is strictly camping (mobile tents) only.  This trek is strenuous and may be better suited to more adventurous hikers. The Machame route is normally completed in a minimum of 6 days/5nights on the mountain.

RONGAI ROUTE: There is only one route over on the north eastern side of the mountain, Rongai, which is usually a five night climb. This lesser known track may not be quite as spectacular as the western routes, but it does usually have far lower traffic than the other five night routes. This route retains a sense of unspoilt wilderness and offers a different perspective on Kilimanjaro by approaching it from the north.It is generally considered to be the easiest of the quality routes on the mountain. Rongai is the best route for people who are looking for a decent quality experience and are perhaps not absolutely confident about their fitness.

 UMBWE ROUTE: The Umbwe route, which is based in the south, is a 6-day / 5-night tour and is said to be the most scenic and difficult one offered on Kilimanjaro. The first two days are extremely steep, muddy and generally strenuous making it only suitable for well-trained mountaineers. An acclimatization day is rarely offered on the standard programme, but can be added whereby giving the climber an extra day in the Karanga Valley. The descent trail is the same as the Mweka Route.

LEMOSHO(SHIRA) GLADES ROUTE: The Lemosho Glades route is perhaps the least used initial ascent route on Kilimanjaro, partly because of its remote location and likewise the difficult roads leading to the trailhead. The road to the trailhead is only accessible by 4-wheel drive vehicles and can be impassable during wet periods. The trailhead is at relatively high elevation, and thus we start slow and easy on this route. Buffalo and elephant sightings are possible on the first day trekking through the forest, and the trail is often overgrown from lack of use.

The route is the longest distance to trek up Kilimanjaro, so fitness certainly plays a role in the enjoyment and success of this trek. The Lemosho (Shira) route takes 7 days / 6 nights on the mountain. Overall, the distance covered and the intensity of the final few days make this trek a good choice only for the experienced hiker.  The many changes of scenery and spectacular hike across the Shira Plateau make this trek truly special. There are no huts on this route, the accommodation is in mountain tents.

Mount Kenya climbing routes

Group of safari tourists at the base of Mount Kenya getting ready to climb to the peak

Naro Moru and Sirimon trek – both on the west side of the mountain, normally five days and either camping or a combination of camping and huts.

Mount Kenya Traverse – up the Naro Moru or Sirimon route and down the Chogoria on the east side, five days camping or combination with huts.

Summit Circuit – up the Naro Moru route, round the climbing peaks of Batian and Nelion and down the Chogoria route, six days camping with option to use huts.

Burguret Route – up the little used Burguret route on the west side and down the Chogoria route. Five days wild camping.

Batian Peak – a highly technical rock climb to the top of the highest peak on the mountain

Nelion Peak – a technical route to the second highest peak on the mountain.

Africa Mountain Climbing Packing / Gear List

Africa mountain climbing adventures climb mount Kenya and mount Kilimanajaro

TRAVEL DOCUMENTS:

  • Valid passport and visa
  • Airline ticket
  • International health card with immunizations
  • Travel insurance
  • Medical insurance
  • US$ cash / Travelers Checks / Credit Card

ESSENTIAL ITEMS:

  • Duffel bag – large enough for all climbing gear and clothing. To be carried by the porters. An extra bag to be left at the hotel with extra gear
  • Small luggage lock – to lock zippers
  • Day backpack – between 20 – 35 litres. Large enough to carry your water, camera, raincoat, lunch pack, snacks & warm clothing
  • Sleeping bag
  • Ski-pole / walking stick
  • Water bottle / containers
  • Mount Kilimanjaro/Mount Kenya map (Can be bought at Park gate)

HIGH ALTITUDE GEAR:

  • Waterproof, breathable & windproof jacket (outer wear like Ventex or Gore-Tex)
  • Waterproof, breathable & windproof pants (outer wear)
  • Polar fleece (middle layer)
  • Thermal underwear (under layers)
  • Mittens or warm gloves
  • Glove liners (if necessary)
  • One pair thermal socks
  • Balaclava
  • Gaiters
  • Thermal water flask

HIKING GEAR:

  • Shorts
  • Hiking pants
  • Regular underwear
  • T-shirts
  • Raincoat or Poncho

FOOTWEAR:

  • Water resistant semi-stiff hiking boots – mid weight boots work great
  • Shoes for overnight camps – i.e. sneakers, running shoes, etc.
  • Socks – several pairs for the climb
  • Liner socks – to keep your feet dry and limit the risk of blisters

EQUIPMENT:

  • Sun hat or similar (with a brim)
  • Collapsible ski stick (optional but highly recommended)
  • Water bottles – two or three (total capacity at least 4 litres)
  • Head lamp, good strong one with spare batteries and an extra light bulb
  • Water purification tablets
  • Sunglasses, good quality dark lenses for the climb, with a securing strap
  • Flashlight (torch) with spare batteries

PERSONAL ITEMS:

  • Toilet kit (soap, tooth brush, toilet articles, wet wipes, etc.)
  • Towel
  • Sun screen and lip protection, SPF 30+
  • Ziploc bags, to protect camera, binoculars, etc. from dust
  • Toilet paper
  • Money belt for passport and valuables

MEDICAL & FIRST AID SUPPLIES:

  • Headache tablets
  • Altitude sickness-Diamox (if not allergic to sulpha)
  • Diarrhoea – Imodium
  • Nausea – Valoid
  • Malaria – Prophylaxis
  • Water purification tablets
  • Painkillers
  • Muscular sprains
  • Abrasions blisters and cuts – Plaster, bandages
  • Antiseptic cream – Betadine
  • Flu and colds
  • Eye drops
  • Insect repellent

OPTIONAL ITEMS:

  • Camera, extra lenses, memory cards and spare batteries
  • Binoculars
  • Powdered sports drinks for the climb (ex. Game or Isotonic drinks)
  • Pocket knife
  • Notebook & pencil
  • Plastic bags to keep clothing dry (masking tape)
  • Energy snacks and sweets
  • Video camera, tapes / memory cards, battery packs and tri-pod

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All fields with an asterisk (*) are required

Tour Information

Help us create your perfect Safari! Tell us about your travel choices, any unique experiences you desire, and upcoming special occasions.