MARA TRIANGLE CONSERVANCY

An Untouristed Expanse of Massive Wildlife

Lions? Leopards? And Chimps

The Mara Triangle offers three spectacular advantages for safari-goers.

  • It is immense – occupying fully one-third of the entire Masai Mara region
  • Located on the border of the Serengeti plains, it is the entry and exit route for the Great Migration, ensuring sightings of thousands of wildlife
  • Because access by road is challenging, there are disproportionately few tourists in the area

All of this makes for one of the finest safari experiences in the Masai Mara if not all of Kenya.

The 510 sq km (126,000 sq mi) Triangle sits between two natural borders – the Mara River, site of the migration crossing, and the spectacular Oloololo Escarpment, a dramatic 400-meter (1,312 ft) tall natural formation. In between these borders, visitors will traverse through a stunning landscape of red oat grasslands, volcanic hills, and riverine forests.

Animal Crossings and Viewings

Bordering Tanzania’s Serengeti, safari-goers will enjoy a front-row seat to the yearly (June – October) Great Migration, as thousands, then hundreds of thousands of wildebeest, zebra, and gazelle flood into the Mara.

Predators like lions, leopards, and cheetah, as well as crocodiles in the Mara River, lie in wait for this flood of grazers to pour onto the Mara lands. All of Africa’s ‘Big Five’ are here and visitors have easily spotted the full array in just a day or so on the conservancy’s savannahs.

Lightly Touristed

Unlike the busy neighboring national reserve, and even some of the sister conservancies in the area, Mara Triangle is truly an empty swath of landscape… as far as tourists are concerned. The roads leading to the conservancy can be tough making the Triangle somewhat secluded. Of course, this only makes your safari more focused and special.

Many visitors find they can more easily access the area by plane, flying into nearby airstrips, the Serena and Kichwa Tembo. Keeping with the ethos of eco-awareness, there are just two accommodations in the conservancy, to further limit the tourist population.

The Maasai

Sharing this land flocked with distinctive acacia trees are the Maasai people, nomadic herders from whom the park takes its name. They construct traditional villages surrounding the reserve and live as they have for eons, herding their cattle and pushing back at an ever-encroaching modern world.

Known for their brightly colored shukas and deft beadwork, the Maasai are a living link to a past that stretches back beyond colonial Africa, to an era when the entire continent was wild and untouched.

Grasslands

Open bush

Dense bush

Riverine Forest

Swamps

Don’t Miss…

Hot Air Ballooning – A truly once-in-a-lifetime experience – take a pre-dawn hot air balloon flight over the dawning fields as they turn gold with the rising sun. During migration season, you’ll be treated to endless vistas of the streaming wildlife below.

Fly Camping – this is true camping in the bush for those who seek absolute authenticity. You’ll bring your own food, water, and firewood. And self-sufficiency. In return, you’ll experience a closeness to nature few ever know.

Campsite Camping – The conservancy also features several public and private campsites for those who want to stay close to the ground but also appreciate the safety and comfort of others.

Out of Africa – Many of the signature scenes from the iconic movie were filmed here. Ask your guide while on your game drives to visit some of these locations.

Community Projects

These reserve-based projects help the livelihoods of the nearby rural communities.

  • Education for local students, including computer skills training
  • Healthcare – providing medical supplies to the local health centers and mobile clinic
  • Energy – providing hundreds of local families with energy-efficient stoves – reducing the need for firewood.

Ol Pejeta Eco-Facts

  • Sanctuaries to protect endangered chimpanzees, oryx, hartebeest, Grevy’s zebra, and bat-eared fox
  • Home to the world’s last remaining northern white rhinos
  • The largest black rhino sanctuary in East Africa – the rhino population has increased by over 100 in the last 25 years.

We Are Partners

Like all conservancies, the Mara Triangle was founded by a cooperation agreement between the landowning herders, the Maasai people, and their tourism partners. First conceived in 1994, the conservancy became active in 2001. There are two accommodation partners in the actual area and several others located just outside.

Mara Serena Lodge and Little Governors’ Camp are situated in the Mara Triangle.

Other nearby camps and lodges include:

  • Angama Mara
  • Bateleur Camp
  • Kichwa Tembo
  • Kilima Camp
  • Mara Engai Wilderness Lodge
  • Mara Siria
  • Mpata Safari Club

Getting there: You can Book a tour with Africa Kenya Safaris. And you’ll go in style – a specially outfitted 4 x 4 safari Jeep.

This is Mara Triangle Conservancy

Its unique location favors great numbers of wildlife sightings while at the same time delightfully offers few tourist sightings. A beautiful swath of landscape, with perfect access to the Great Migration, Mara Triangle is worth the extra effort to get close to a glorious natural experience.

Join us at Mara Triangle

Africa Kenya Safaris offers safaris to Mara Triangle and other nearby conservancies and parks.  Just contact us to get your safari started.

Let’s Get Started

Book This Tour

Personal Information

All fields with an asterisk (*) are required

Tour Information

Help us create your perfect Safari! Tell us about your travel choices, any unique experiences you desire, and upcoming special occasions.